Vancouver councillor wants to ban generators from film shoots and food trucks

Share:

VANCOUVER—Working as a caterer in the movie industry means Michael Thomas often finds himself “in the middle of nowhere,” like the tarmac of the Maple Ridge airport as a crew films a car commercial.

That’s why Thomas, owner of White Rock-based Ocean West Catering, is skeptical of a motion from councillor Adriane Carr scheduled to be discussed at City Hall tomorrow that could phase out conventional gas- and diesel-powered generators used by food-truck operators and the film business.

Carr’s motion aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which she says is aligned with the city’s goal to eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels before 2050. She envisions the industry tapping into electricity delivered through electric plug-ins or tie-ins into city buildings.

Thomas often arrives before anyone else to filming locations around Metro Vancouver to start prepping food, and that includes the person who hook trucks up to a bigger power source, usually a larger diesel-powered generator. In those hours before the film crew arrives, the chef uses his gas-powered generator to do everything from brewing coffee to frying bacon and eggs.

“If they (City of Vancouver) make it super easy, where everyone is on one universal cable, and it’s as easy as plugging in the toaster, then I get it,” Thomas said of moving to electricity. “But sometimes you get to some place, someone is in your parking spot, so you got to park around the corner—there’s too many variables to not have our own generator on board.”

VANCOUVER—Working as a caterer in the movie industry means Michael Thomas often finds himself “in the middle of nowhere,” like the tarmac of the Maple Ridge airport as a crew films a car commercial.

That’s why Thomas, owner of White Rock-based Ocean West Catering, is skeptical of a motion from councillor Adriane Carr scheduled to be discussed at City Hall tomorrow that could phase out conventional gas- and diesel-powered generators used by food-truck operators and the film business.

Carr’s motion aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which she says is aligned with the city’s goal to eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels before 2050. She envisions the industry tapping into electricity delivered through electric plug-ins or tie-ins into city buildings.

Thomas often arrives before anyone else to filming locations around Metro Vancouver to start prepping food, and that includes the person who hook trucks up to a bigger power source, usually a larger diesel-powered generator. In those hours before the film crew arrives, the chef uses his gas-powered generator to do everything from brewing coffee to frying bacon and eggs.

“If they (City of Vancouver) make it super easy, where everyone is on one universal cable, and it’s as easy as plugging in the toaster, then I get it,” Thomas said of moving to electricity. “But sometimes you get to some place, someone is in your parking spot, so you got to park around the corner—there’s too many variables to not have our own generator on board.”